De-Sexing Surgery

De-Sexing Surgery

As well as minimising the possibility of unwanted puppies or kittens, ‘desexing’ or surgical sterilisation may also significantly reduce the risk of health problems in your pet. At Diamond Valley Vets we recommend and provide desexing procedures for dogs, cats, rabbits and ferrets at our veterinary hospitals in Eltham Central and Montmorency.

Male animals are castrated or neutered, which is the removal of both testicles, whilst female animals are speyed, involving the removal of the ovaries and most of the uterus (an ovariohysterectomy).

Desexing is a day procedure. We recommend 7-10 days of rest and recovery time post operatively. Our nurses will provide you with post-operative instructions on the day of your pets procedure.

Please contact our knowledgeable Team at our Eltham Central and Montmorency Hospitals to discuss whether a desexing procedure is suitable for your pet, or click through the appropriate species for some frequently asked questions.

Why should I consider castrating my dog?

Castration prevents disease of the testes, and reduces the incidence of testosterone-related disease. Castration can improve a male dogs behaviour. Entire male dogs are more likely to to exhibit dominance behaviour including aggression and inappropriate urine marking  Entire male dogs are also far more likely to want to escape and stray, which increases their risk of injury.

 

Why should I consider speying my dog?

In addition to the prevention of unwanted litters of puppies, speying a  female dog significantly reduces the risk of mammary (breast) cancer developing as she ages. Older entire female dogs are also at risk of developing life threatening infections of the uterus. Entire female dogs are also more likely to stray and get injured when on heat. If you choose to breed your female dog we still recommend desexing after she ceases breeding.

 

At what age should I desex my dog?

In the past we have generally recommended 6 months as the ideal age to desex a dog, however there is now evidence that suggests large and giant breed dogs should be allowed some extra growth time before desexing. We recommend discussing the ideal age to desex your dog with one of our veterinarians when in for a vaccination or health check.  Please note that some local councils suggest desexing at 12 weeks of age for a reduced registration fee. We do not recommend that dogs are desexed this young if it can be avoided.

Please see our Your New Puppy page for further information.

Why should I consider castrating my cat?

Entire male cats are extremely territorial and are far more likely to want to roam and engage in aggressive behaviour with other cats. This increases their risk of injury and disease including FIV infection. Male cats are also more likely to urine spray to mark their territory. Entire male cats significantly contribute to the stray cat population – part of responsible cat ownership in Australia includes desexing your male cat.

 

Why should I consider speying my cat?

Entire female cats can have multiple litters of kittens every year – they are very efficient breeders, coming on heat every 2-3 weeks in the breeding season. Desexing reduces the numbers of unwanted kittens being born – every year many kittens are euthanased due to an oversupply, especially in summer.  Speyed female cats are less likely to wander and get involved in fights. Part of responsible cat ownership in Australia includes desexing your female cat.

 

At what age should I desex my cat?

We recommend desexing cats at 5-6 months of age. With veterinary advice desexing can be performed at a younger age if necessary.

Please see our Your New Kitten page for further information.

We recommend desexing rabbits, even in a single rabbit household. Obviously if you have a male and female rabbit living together they will breed if left entire! Male rabbits that remain entire are more likely to be aggressive and urine mark their environment. Female rabbits have a high incidence of cancer of the uterus – more than 50% will have changes by 3 years of age if not speyed. Speying offers significant protection against uterine cancer, and can improve the temperament of a female rabbit.

Rabbits can reach sexual maturity from 16-20 weeks of age. We recommend desexing female rabbits no earlier than 6 months of age, and male rabbits from 5 months of age, or a little younger if the male shares a hutch with an entire female!

Please see our Rabbit Care page for further information or arrange a visit or call to our hospitals to further discuss your ferrets desexing needs.

Female ferrets can suffer from a form of anaemia (lowered blood cells) if they come on heat and do not mate. Prolonged oestrogen (hormone) release causes bone marrow disease, and this can progress to life threatening anaemia. Desexing prevents the ferret coming into heat, and therefore protects against anaemia. Please see our Ferret Care page for further information or arrange a visit or call to our hospitals to further discuss your ferrets desexing needs.